A Surprisingly Good Visit from NHS Mental Health

IMG_0391This day proved a welcome relief, in a life of no reliefs.

The psychiatrist, a tall, attractive Scottish lady, was extraordinarily human, unassuming, and affable.

And the psychologist, unlike some I’ve taught, and the one in 2007, did not observe, or judge me, and had personality.

And, usefully, busied herself with Isabel’s Progress File from Robert Ogden School.

So, all went well in the kitchen.

So well,  two hours flew by without coffee.

I cannot relay, how good it feels, to be respected, and deferred to.

It had never happened before.

I almost felt like a person, rather than the object of negative analysis.

Issy had been up most of the night and was still sleep.

The long awaited period was evident, when we eventually wondered into her bedroom, andwere told to get out.

As usual, no one appeared to know anything,  so were filled in on the chronology to date.

The psychiatrist asked about food preferences, medical allergies and medication.

Worryingly,the type of questions asked before an inpatient stay.

I hoped,they were standard, but then wondered why, the information was not obtained from Isabel’s medical records.

But such are the mysteries of information sharing protocols.

Annoying for us, and professionals

The only major worrying question, on reflection was,

‘Did Issy eat with us?’

My proven justifiable  paranoia, bounced me back, to our first education package, and a comment, I had made to a Reed agency education carer, who’d latterly became a spy.

It was innocuous enough, but, it appears anything, can be made to fit the agenda.

On describing Issy’s trauma, after her 48 bruise NAS restraint, I remarked, ’Issy  would no longer sit and eat with us at the table in our apartment lounge in Ireland’.

This appeared to have been seized upon, by the worker’s grilling ‘education’ boss, and  relayed to our social worker and spun in  our last core assessment to;

It has been observed by workers that the family tend to sit around the table together to eat while Isobel eats alone in the lounge’

I complained about this in April 2014, pointing out, it could not ‘have been observed by workers that the family tend to sit around the table to eat’ as;

a) No worker has ever seen us eat as a family.

And,

b) We do not ‘eat as a family’, except at Christmas and Easter; the drop leaf table in the kitchen being rarely used.

We eat from plates on our knees, in the lounge, watching TV, as we are soap fans,

And

c) Issy has never eaten in the lounge.  She  eats in her bedroom.

It had been made in a sectionheaded Comment on the young person’s needs in relation to family and social relationships, thus, the workers impossible observation, of our deliberate isolating of Issy, appearing evidence of  emotional abuse.

This being one of the very, if only specific questions asked of Issy, and coupled with ‘ I wouldn’t like crumbs in the sitting room’ was both infuriating and worrying.

As it appeared information we had tried to officially correct and was incorrect second hand hearsay, as no worker had ever seen us eat let alone at a table, had been relayed to a NHS psychiatric team charged with assessing  any  emotional abuse of Issy at home.

Excepting for this rather large ponderable,- where they working from a crib sheet ? all went well.

Angel Eyes appeared on Monday and Thursday.

And as usual was a star, and worked her socks off.

Issy has been up, and in a good mood, despite the period.

But wants to be permanently tickled.

But then, who doesn’t?

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